It is currently Thu Feb 27, 2020 7:01 am




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 
 Working in the US, VISA Issue 
Author Message
Site Admin

Joined: Fri Dec 28, 2007 11:51 am
Posts: 305
Post Working in the US, VISA Issue
The main difficulty is that you have to good enough for the a potential employer to want to go through the hassles and paying the legal fees in order to get your work visa, which won't be a sure bet even then.

Which brings me to the other difficulty is that the approval process over at Homeland is, well, iffy at best. I don't know how much the actual process has changed over the years, but I knew some people who worked over at INS before it got absorbed into Homeland, and the general concensus was that if the person doing the approving was in a bad mood, you might get rejected just because.

Another is that being from across the pond, you're almost guaranteed to not be able to start work immediately. There are issues of relocation, housing, etc, that the potential employer wouldn't have to deal with (or at least, with less severity) if they hired locally.

Those are the first three biggies that come to mind off hand. That said, applying is easy. It's nailing the job that's the potential snag. ;)

A degree from a 4-year institution is a must for the H-1b; in lieu of a degree, you'd need 12 years of working experience in the appropriate field.

--------------
Handheld-spec Folio
LoTekK.com


Last edited by moderator on Sat Dec 29, 2007 6:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Sat Dec 29, 2007 6:01 pm
Profile
Site Admin

Joined: Fri Dec 28, 2007 11:51 am
Posts: 305
Post Re: Working in the US, VISA Issue
Having a US degree plays an advantage.....or at least serve as a proof of talent!!

I know when Bluesky Studios applied the H-1 Visa for me, they had to put what ever information to substantiate my service to the company OR "the US economy on the whole". This is becos, the people working at the HOMELAND SECUIRITY will not understand the TALENT based on REEL concept!

To conclude, the company employing you won't neccesary look at your level of schooling but it does serve in getting the VISA.


-------------
Melvin Tan
Animator
Bluesky Studios
http://www.melvin-tan.net


Sat Dec 29, 2007 6:03 pm
Profile
Site Admin

Joined: Fri Dec 28, 2007 11:51 am
Posts: 305
Post Re: Working in the US, VISA Issue
If you have a diploma, you can have it evaluated by an education credential evaluation service in the US. They can qualify a 3d related diploma such that it is equivalent to 3 years US degrees, you also have to provide other things such as your reel, referral letters, etc

Eventually, it still depends on how badly the company wants you. If they want you really bad, they will go to the extent of settling all these issues for you.

--------------
dominic qwek

http://www.3dcreature.com

http://www.dominicqwek.com


Sat Dec 29, 2007 6:06 pm
Profile
Site Admin

Joined: Fri Dec 28, 2007 11:51 am
Posts: 305
Post Re: Working in the US, VISA Issue
For singaporeans with degrees, it is possible to get the H-1b1 for work in the states. http://singapore.usembassy.gov/fta_visas. It is easier to get than a H-1b, but has a shorter length if I remember properly. Best is to get a green card, lol!

Alvin

--------------
http://www.alvinvfx.com


Sat Dec 29, 2007 6:07 pm
Profile
Site Admin

Joined: Fri Dec 28, 2007 11:51 am
Posts: 305
Post Re: Working in the US, VISA Issue
I found this website to have interesting articles about getting a work visa for the us:

Murthy Law
http://www.murthy.com/

There are a lot of recruiters you can contact that can send your resume or reel around. A lot of them cold call. I got one that called my home number once which I never give out. I think the main barrier to entry is probably the work visa.

Your best bet would probably to get an F-1 student visa, study in the US for a while and then apply for the one year F-1 internship thing, work on that and while you're on that apply for the H1-B work visa.

-------------------

Hector Yee
http://hectorgon.blogspot.com/


Sat Dec 29, 2007 6:09 pm
Profile
Site Admin

Joined: Fri Dec 28, 2007 11:51 am
Posts: 305
Post Re: Working in the US, VISA Issue
Just wanted to add a few more things that might be useful to note:

* the INS (Immigration and Naturalization Service) has now been absorbed by the Homeland Security Department, with more stringent policies.
http://www.dhs.gov/ximgtn/

* the H-1B work visa is probably the most common way for a foreigner to work in the US. It is suitable for degree holders or people with significant experience.

* you will need an employer to "sponsor" or vouch for you. This includes showing that you are capable of doing the job and can be a relevant degree, or some number of years of experience, or outstanding work that is recognized/acclaimed by the industry, such as published works.

* your employer will need to prove to Homeland Security WHY you are better than locals and why they can't hire a local to do the job. The upside is that they have to pay you a competitive salary (to prevent companies from using cheap foreign labor).

* if you are graduating from a US university you can apply for an F-1 student visa (valid for 1 year) with your school first to give yourself time to find a job. After you are employed, you can get your employer to sponsor the H-1B. This is considered one of the "easiest" ways to get the H-1B.

* the cost of the H-1B is around US$2-3K but this cost is usually borne by the employer.

* the H-1B is valid for 3 years. After that, it can be renewed once more for another 3 years. After that, you will need to leave the US for at least 1 year, after which you can return to the US and restart the cycle.

* H-1Bs have an annual quota. The quota is now about 60,000 per year (it was around 180,000 back in 2002). This quota is the total for ALL industries, for ALL foreign workers. However, high-tech jobs tend to be given some preference over others.

* H-1Bs are issued in October but you (or rather, your employer) can apply as early as April. Some people say there is a Jan period as well but I haven't been able to confirm that.

* H-1Bs typically run out very quickly. e.g, For 2006, all 60,000 applications were filled by May 26 (less than 2 months).

* having a good lawyer that specializes in immigration law can significantly improve your chances of getting the H-1B. Beware of scams as there are a lot of shady websites purporting to expedite your H-1B application for a small fee.

There is also the O-1 visa for people with extraordinary talent. See http://www.oiss.yale.edu/visa/o1.htm

If you are working in the local office of a company with an office in the US, you can check out the L-1 visa for transferring to the US office. http://www.workpermit.com/us/us_l1.htm

danien
--------------
Reach out to CG artists and professionals across the creative industries with your job ads, all in one location, or simply check out the latest creative jobs at http://jobberwokky.com


Sat Dec 29, 2007 6:12 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Sat Apr 18, 2009 12:10 am
Posts: 12
Location: Singapore
Post Re: Working in the US, VISA Issue
I thought this will be of interest too: http://animationtipsandtricks.com/2009/ ... s-who.html

It's the latest blog post from Animation Mentor based on the question "Do You Have Any Tips for Animators Who Live Outside of the United States on How to Get a Job in the States?"

I think the author is directing the answers to international students who are studying or have an U.S degree. A quick summary of the post: Win film festivals/awards to increase your chances of landing a job in U.S.

_________________
Lin Ping
http://ahblocky.wordpress.com/


Sat Jun 06, 2009 6:10 pm
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group.
Designed by Vjacheslav Trushkin for Free Forums/DivisionCore.